Annie Clark, CLTC, Vice President

Why I Do What I Do

Why I Do What I Do

Take a step back in time to the 1970’s. It was a warm summer day in Massapequa, NY. A typical, humid, but glorious day for children to be playing together outside. The smell of fresh cut grass was in the air, and the children played tag and raced from yard to yard without a care in the world. Ann and Bill Crawford had lived in the neighborhood for some time, and Ann loved being outdoors tending to her beautiful garden of flowers and bushes. She whistled while she worked and smiled as she watched her 8- year-old daughter playing games with the kids across the street. Their giggles brought a smile to her face. Suddenly, her little 8-year-old looked over to her mom and saw that she was lying face down in the street. Her father was at work, so she ran to the neighbor’s house. The neighbor happened to be married to a police officer, so they called for help. The little girl watched helplessly as she watched her mom taken away in an ambulance. 

Her father rushed home from work and the little girl jumped into his arms with fear and trembling. “What’s going to happen to me? Who’s going to take care of me when you are at work?” Questions any child would wonder, seeing a parent whisked off to emergency. Her father tried to reassure her that “everything will be okay”. As it turned out, he was right. It was a case of hypoglycemia, and she was treated and released. The little girl grew into a teenager and was ready to start her sophomore year in high school, when her mom had a very serious heart attack. This heart attack would require a very serious surgery. Again, the questions formed in her mind. Is mom going to be okay? Are we going to be okay? After a period of recovery, her parents sat her down to let her know that they were planning for the future, so that she wouldn’t have to worry anymore if she would be okay. They explained to her that they were doing their pre-planning, a will, and a trust. They wanted to get their ducks in a row due to the seriousness of the situation. Well, that little girl was me. This may sound crazy, but I realized that the heart attack my mom had, was really a gift. It was a warning sign to prepare for the future. And I made it my life’s mission to make sure that other little girls and boys, or husbands or wives, are not left wondering “am I going to be okay”. You support your children emotionally, spiritually, and even financially, but one of the greatest gifts of love is to give them less worry, by taking the steps to have a plan in place.